Home Conservation News Sanctuary Nature Foundation Launches ‘Mud On Boots’ Project

Sanctuary Nature Foundation Launches ‘Mud On Boots’ Project

Sanctuary Nature Foundation Launches ‘Mud On Boots’ Project

The Sanctuary Nature Foundation announced the launch of the Mud on Boots Project, a programme designed to empower and support grassroots conservationists in India. The foundation has selected 12 grassroots conservation leaders from across India, for the years 2017 and 2018.

Goatherd Urs Khan from Rajasthan is one of 12 grassroots conservationists selected by the Sanctuary Nature Foundation to lead local-level conservation projects in the country. Photo: Pramod Patil.

The Sanctuary Nature Foundation announced the launch of the Mud on Boots Project designed to empower and support grassroots conservationists in India. As its first initiative, the Sanctuary Nature Foundation has selected 12 field conservationists, each of whom is already contributing significantly to biodiversity conservation and community engagement, to lead projects across the country. These individuals were selected by inviting nominations from some of India’s leading wildlife conservationists. Each project leader will be allocated three lakh rupees over the span of two years for on- ground conservation work.

Some of the selected conservationists are: Urs Khan, a goatherd from Rajasthan working to protect the critically endangered Great Indian Bustard; Sajal Madhu who works for the conservation of elephants in coal mining-afflicted areas of Chhattisgarh; Sunil Harsana, a polio survivor who is a guardian of the sacred forest of Mangar Bani in Haryana; Anoko Mega, a Mishmi tribal from Arunachal Pradesh, who is striving to transform community attitudes towards hunting; and Joydeb Pradhan, a senior citizen in West Bengal who protects the habitat of the vulnerable state animal – the fishing cat.

Bittu Sahgal, Founder, Sanctuary Nature Foundation, said, “As the name implies, the project was developed to empower those conservationists who are doing valuable work in the field, who have mud on their boots, but who tend to fall under the radar of governments, large wildlife organisations and the media. By giving these earth heroes even minimal support to execute their projects and by spotlighting their contribution, we intend to magnify the impact of their conservation work and connect them with a wider network of wildlife and protectors across the world. We expect to add more project leaders, especially women, in the coming months.”

     
     
     

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