Home Conservation News Mud On Boots Project Leader Nominated For Documentary Award

Mud On Boots Project Leader Nominated For Documentary Award

Mud On Boots Project Leader Nominated For Documentary Award

Anoko Mega, project leader under Sanctuary’s Mud on Boots project has been nominated  for documentary award under the ‘amateur’ category of the 9th Centre for Media Studies ‘VATAVARAN’ international environment and wildlife film festival and forum. His eight minute long documentary showcases the expansive biodiversity at the Mehao Wildlife Sanctuary in Arunachal Pradesh.

Anoko Mega Photo: Anoko Mega.

Anoko Mega, a spirited project leader under Sanctuary’s Mud on Boots Project, is determined to change attitudes towards hunting within his community. A mishmi tribal, Anoko is a resident of Roing in Arunachal Pradesh and works towards the conservation of the eastern Hoollock gibbon ,and to educate his community on the need for environmental protection. He is also the driving force behind a local youth conservation group called the Abralow Memorial Multipurpose Society.

Anoko had been diligently documenting the expansive biodiversity at the Mehao Wildlife Sanctuary and has now submitted an eight minute long documentary showcasing the same to the 9th Centre for Media Studies ‘VATAVARAN’ international environment and wildlife film festival and forum. Anoko’s documentary has been nominated under the ‘amateur’ category and will be screened at the forthcoming festival in Delhi this November.

Moving through the dense forests of the region, as Anko’s lens shifts from one green frame to another, the audience gets a glimpse of the enchanting Mehao Wildlife Sanctuary in the Mishmi hills. A Striated Laugingthrush here, a barking deer there, Mehao’s landscape is teeming with vibrant wildlife.

The documentary also touches upon the delicate issue of wild-meat hunting by members of the tribal community. “In our Idu Mishmi language, there is no term for ‘conservation’ per se”, says a community member in the film, elucidating that the idea of conservation in the community exists only through cultural taboos. Back in the day, hunting was carried out primarily for self-consumption. Now, due to commercialisation, a huge demand for bush meat and wildlife derivatives has taken over the market. In the face of monetisation, the traditional taboos have been abandoned.

“There is an abundance of wildlife species here in our Mishmi hills. The researchers believe this region to be a mini living lab. However, the locals here are still unaware of the importance of this diversity. Therefore I have taken it upon myself to create awareness. With support from Sanctuary Nature Foundation and Green Hub, I have been conducting awareness campaigns in schools and villages. This documentary is my heartfelt contribution towards the cause of conservation of my beautiful land” says Anoko.

Watch Anoko’s documentary, here. And do leave him a comment of support!

Author: Anadya Singh

     
     
     

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