Home Conservation News Wildlife Biologist Dr. George Schaller Receives Highest Honour At National Geographic Society

Wildlife Biologist Dr. George Schaller Receives Highest Honour At National Geographic Society

Wildlife Biologist Dr. George Schaller Receives Highest Honour At National Geographic Society

Vice President of Panthera, celebrated wildlife biologist and one of the world’s finest field scientists, Dr. George Schaller has received the National Geographic Society’s Hubbard Medal for his lifetime commitment to wildlife conservation. Dr. Schaller has devoted 60 years to the conservation and research of several endangered species such as mountain gorillas, snow leopards, lions, Tibetan antelope, wild yak, giant pandas and tigers by helping establish more than 15 Protected Areas worldwide for these animals. This includes the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Alaska, which is now regarded as the world’s largest wildlife preserve. Sanctuary Asia has also honored Dr. Schaller’s lifetime achievement by awarding him with the Lifetime Service Award in 2011.

Photo courtesy: Dr. George Schaller.

The Hubbard medal is named after National Geographic Society’s first president, Gardiner Green Hubbard. With the recognition, Dr. Schaller will join past recipients such as Charles Lindbergh, Jane Goodall, Jacques Piccard and James Cameron in receiving the Society’s highest honour that recognises lifetime achievement in exploration, discovery and research. His book on mountain gorillas The Mountain Gorilla: Ecology and Behavior in 1963 brought awareness of the species and their intelligence and gentleness. In The Year of the Gorilla, Dr. Schaller also recorded his two-year study on mountain gorillas of Virunga National Park in the late 1950s.

Panthera’s CEO Dr. Alan Rabinowitz congratulated Dr. Schaller, “George is a conservation legend and true champion for wild animals and places everywhere. As one of the world’s foremost wildlife biologists, he helped to carve and create the field of wildlife conservation. Armed only with a notepad, George courageously charted untouched territories in search of wildlife, and continues to do so even today. He continues to inspire generation after generation of young wildlife enthusiasts to dedicate their lives to conserving our planet’s biodiversity.”

     
     
     

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