Gibbons: The Swinging Singers Of Forests

Monica Szczupider finds herself in the company of gibbons, 'lesser apes' that are native to Asia, in an unexpected place. Acknowledging the gibbon sanctuary paradigm at Summerville in the United States, she articulates the need to direct conservation…

Conservation, Interrupted?

Chandni Gurusrikar stands strong in support of the Cauvery Forest Department as she delineates the circumstances of the shootout that took place between forest staff and suspected poachers in March 2017. Aggrieved by the neglect endured by forest staff in our country, she questions the indifference that those responsible for defending our forests are subjected to.

A River Dolphin’s Ear-View Of India’s Waterways Development Plans

Our national inland waterways ambitions spell doom for the endangered Gangetic river dolphin unless better sense prevails and vital mitigation measures are taken, warns Nachiket Kelkar.

Mountain Ghosts, In The Shadows

Wildlife conservationist Sheren Shrestha articulates the importance of community participation, citing the paradigm of the Kanchenjunga Conservation Area. He narrates his experience of assisting the KCA authorities in the blue sheep census, in one of the most remote parts of Nepal.

India’s Indus Dolphins: Very Few, Very Threatened

In 2008, upstream from the Harike Barrage, scientists discovered a small population of the endangered Indus river dolphin. Science writer Aathira Perinchery analyses relevant studies and speaks with experts to understand if they have a future in India.

Restoring The Western Ghats’ Ariyankavu Corridor

Srinivas Vaidyanathan and Dr. A.J.T. Johnsingh urge for the protection of a critical link between the Periyar and Agastyamalai landscapes in the southern region of the Western Ghats.

Black Baza: Where Biodiversity-Friendly Coffee Takes Wing

Arshiya Bose, founder of Black Baza Coffee Co., gives us a glimpse into India’s chequered coffee-growing history, introduces her fledgling business and explains why biodiversity-friendly brews make for a better cuppa.

Bleeding Orangutans

Though we share 97 per cent of our DNA with the imperiled species, we are nowhere like them. Today, orangutans have only humans to blame for having just a decade left on this planet. Purva Variyar enumerates how the palm oil industry, man’s apathetic attitude towards Indonesia's rainforests and orangutans own biology is spelling doom for the Bornean and Sumatran orangutans.

The Wolf In Your Dog

Reports of feral dogs attacking wildlife are on the rise across India. Abi Tamim Vanak and Chandrima Home underscore a conservation concern that has largely been brushed under the carpet.

Shared Goals: Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) – The Future Of Conservation

Nature conservancies spearheaded by the private sector, and supported by the public sector, might just be critical to future conservation in India, writes Zoravar Gill.

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