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Conservation

From Nainadevi To Nandhaur

Freshly initiated into the world of wildlife conservation, Vaishali Rawat goes on a meandering journey through northern Kumaon’s precious forests.

For The Greater Good

People can and do make a difference writes Purnima Devi Barman, who shares with Sanctuary readers a heartwarming and successful conservation initiative driven by local communities that have taken upon themselves the task of saving one of the world’s most endangered birds.

Of Grimmett Guides And Solar Panels

The E-Base, at first sight, seems like just about any other classroom. A laptop, a television, a few bulletin boards, a recently added library; how extraordinary could this space be? Very, explains Pooja Choksi.

Mayawati And Other River Monsters – In Search Of Gharials In The Ken River

India appears to have lost its love of rivers, write Tarun Nair and Suyash Katdare, two researchers whose mission it is to somehow keep rivers free-flowing and hospitable for one of the most endangered crocodiles in the world, the gharial.

Poisoned And Paraded

Rivu Ghorai describes a gory strategy that farmers in West Bengal are employing to scare birds away from their fields.

The ‘Bottled’ Wolf

The presence of a pack of Indian wolves in the buffer of the Umred-Karhandla Wildlife Sanctuary was a cause for celebration, followed by panic when a lone wolf was sighted in a nasty predicament. Vinit Arora narrates the ensuing rescue and the moment of gratification that made it worthwhile.

Linking Rivers – Delinking Life

The late Shehla Masood wrote on June 14, 2010, to Jairam Ramesh, former Union Minister, Environment and Forests: “Panna showed signs of Sariska, but the insensitive authorities never paid heed to the signals, letters, research. Finally, Panna lost all its tigers.” Once again, in 2014, warnings about the destruction of Panna’s lifeline, the Ken river, are being willfully ignored.

Scavenger With A Killer Instinct

In two separate yet strangely similar situations, a killer was caught red-handed with photographic evidence of the ‘crime’. Better known as a scavenger that performs a vital service in keeping India’s forests and towns free from rotting carcasses, the golden jackal Canis aureus is also quite an accomplished hunter. Most records speak of this solitary canid as a stalker of rodents or poultry. But Indraneel…

Lost Laurels – The Story Of A Tree, A Forest And The Wildlife They Support

What was once traditional and sustainable has turned into an ecological threat to the bhabar tracts of the Himalayan foothills of western Uttarakhand, write Dr. A.J T. Johnsingh and Dr. Bivash Pandav.

Bear Necessities

A group of researchers throw light on one of the Indian jungles’ least understood creatures – the sloth bear. Their observations ratify the simple premise that if we are able to guarantee wild species space, isolation and protection, they are likely to flourish with little or no human help.

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