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Dance of Death

After a decade of denial by wildlife officials, the truth is out. Wild tigers are being taken down. According to the National Tiger Conservation Authority, we have lost half of all wild tigers that existed in India less than five years ago. Even granting that five years ago, the number of tigers was nowhere near what Project Tiger had been claiming, today’s figures are nothing short of depressing. A combination of…

The Nero Factor: India Has A Choice – Help Put Out The Climate Fire… Or Die.

Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, son of Cnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus – or Nero, as he was better known – did not really ‘fiddle’ while the Great Fire raged across Rome over six calamitous days. According to Dio Cassius, on those fateful July days in A.D. 64, Nero actually climbed atop his palace roof from where he had a gallery view of burning Rome... and then loudly sang ‘The Capture of Troy’.

Climate Swings – January? Or Is This March?

I have been intrigued by the idea of snow since I was a child. Most of us who grew up in warm climes look at incredible mountain scenes washed in white and make a silent wish to wake up one day to see fresh, fallen snow. I have been in New York for the past few months and was certain that the peak of winter would guarantee me the snow I always sought. The last snow-less December was way back in 1877. In the last four…

The Deadly Web

I cannot think of a single life form on Earth that has a net negative impact on the health of the planet; can you?

Carbon neutral squirrels; negligent policy makers

It’s a rodent, the smallest of the Indian giant squirrels and next to impossible to sight – largely because it spends most of its life up in the canopy of thick forests, far from human eyes. Also because it is very rare, and getting rarer.

Fiddling While India Burns

Bittu Sahgal suggests that climate change is taking a toll on wild species and ecosystems and that India is making a huge strategic error by pushing forward with carbon-based energy options. For the benefit of the Neros in our midst, the author suggests that the Indian subcontinent will be one of the worst victims of climate change in the decades ahead.

Climate Change Endangering Asia’s wildlife

August 2000: Human-induced climate change is the most serious problem facing the world in the 21st century. The increasing amounts of oil, coal and other fossil fuels being burnt as a result of our development priorities are emitting ever-more heat-trapping gases – principally carbon dioxide – while simultaneously destroying the forests that normally absorb them. The result: a greenhouse…

Tigers & Terrorism

The country’s internal security is at risk because timber and wildlife contraband, effortlessly obtained from unprotected forests, is being traded for drugs, guns and explosives. Conversely, poachers posing as naxalites, militants, insurrectionists and terrorists, exploit the vacuum created when forest guards and officers are forced at the point of a gun to abandon their posts.

The Lure Of The Mountains

The world's greatest mountain range is being butchered. As forests and animals die, most people merely stand by and watch, horror-struck, but silent. But there are some whose voice rises to protect the Himalaya. Sunderlal Bahuguna, now recognised as one of the prime builders of India's new environmental awakening, has lived in the Himalaya throughout his life.

The Sanctuary Forum

In a world that has eventually realised the value of its natural wealth, most nations are engaged in a race to save what is left of their wildlife, forests and natural areas. But for some animals it may already be too late. Tigers for instance, though saved temporarily, have been isolated in pockets on the sub-continent and do not have the opportunity to intermix between one area and another. This means that their…

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