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Fine Young Wildlife Photographers

Fine Young Wildlife Photographers

This Sanctuary Cub photo feature showcases four young photographers who are going to be the torchbearers of the future of conservation and wildlife photography in India.

Daanish Shastri, 16: “I have been involved with nature and wildlife photography since I was about nine years old, when my mother introduced me to the field. With my inherent love for all things wild, wildlife photography became my passion.”

Spotted deer graze in the Dhikala range of the Corbett Tiger Reserve early in the morning. Photo: Daanish Shastri.

“Being closest to Delhi, where I am a Class 11 student at the Shri Ram School, Corbett and Ranthambhore have been my preferred haunts. I have focused on tigers and elephants but I am getting more interested in birding and bird photography. I won the 3rd prize in the CMS Vatavaran film festival for my film Save Our Sparrows and also a Special Mention in the Sanctuary Wildlife Photography Contest 2012. I have also founded an organisation called the Tiger Youth Foundation to spreading formation and awareness about tiger conservation. My other interests include debating, Model United Nations and football.”

Reflection of the tiger T-24 in the water at the Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve. Photo: Daanish Shastri.

Udayan Rao Pawar, 14: “It was a gift of a field identification guide and binoculars that turned me into a naturalist, and the gift of a camera at the age of nine which turned it into a passion.”

A group of Tibetan Sandgrouse in the Tso Lhamu plateau of North Sikkim. Photo: Udayan Rao Pawar.

“Love for nature came naturally to me at a young age, having grown up in my ancestral house with a large garden, behind which lay forest-covered hills. Visiting remote wilderness areas I became aware of the richness of our land and the utter insensitivity with which we are destroying it. I have been trying, in my own small way, to promote conservation through writing letters, contributing articles and sharing images in both the print and electronic media. One of my images recently won the prestigious BBC Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year.”

A gharial basks on the banks of the Chambal river with a Woolly-necked Stork in the background. Photo: Udayan Rao Pawar.

Aryan Patel, 7: “I went to a zoo when I was four and didn’t like the experience. Animals are happier in the wild. I tell all my friends to visit the jungle and get a true feel of nature.”

The tiger T64 near Rajbagh lake in the Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve.
Photo: Aryan Patel.

“I took my first photograph of a tiger – T17 in Ranthambhore when I was just five years old. I have been visiting the park for the last four years and love being out in the wild. I am a student of Step by Step International School, Jaipur. I hate visiting zoos and want to use my photographs to show why animals and birds should be allowed to be free and wild.”

A lion lazes in Gir National park in Gujarat. Photo: Aryan Patel.

K.A. Dhanuparan, 14: “Since the Annamalai Tiger Reserve is near my village Vettaikaranpudur in Coimbatore, I often explored the forest with my parents.”

A Baya Weaver near a wetland in Vettaikaranpudur. Photo: K.A. Dhanuparan.

“I began photographing when I was six years old when I used my Nikon Coolpix to shoot wildlife around my farm house. My uncle Giri Srinivasan gifted me a Canon 1100 D with 75-300 mm. lens for my 11th birthday. My first photo was a hornbill male on a ficus tree, an amazing and unforgettable day in the wild. Thanks to the support of my family and friends including Thomas Vijayan, who is my guide and mentor, I have been able to travel to several forests in South India. My photos are exhibited at Attaikattaiand Topslip information centers. I am an ECG member and eco-volunteer for ATR.Now I travel with the Canon70D 100-400 mm5.6 lens presented by my grandpa."

A Great Pied Hornbill with a bird in its beak at Valparai in Coimbatore district. Photo: K.A. Dhanuparan.

First appeared in: Sanctuary Cub, March 2014.

 
 
 

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