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CORRUPTION AND WILDLIFE

Posted by: Bittu Sahgal on

Why do I strongly support the national uprising against corruption? Because, apart from all the personal indignity inflicted by blackmailing opportunists on ordinary, law abiding citizens, corruption is the single greatest bludgeon used by thugs of all descriptions (white collar and no collar!) to deforest India and kill its

Madayipara: The land of flowers.

Posted by: arun tp on

 

 

Madayipara is a vast stretch of Rocky terrain spreading near Pazhayangadi Town, in Kannur District of Kerala. It is one of the beautiful landscape existing suppose the last in entire Northern Kerala. The land has immense ecological importance because of its biodiversity of Flora and Fauna.

 

Flora includes rare species of


The Future of the Sundarbans

Posted by: Bittu Sahgal on

There is precious little real on-the-ground cooperation between India and Bangladesh on the issue of climate change and the management of the largest mangrove forest in the world -- the Sundarbans.

 We know, of course, that the Indian Sundarbans has better WILDLIFE management and enforcement than the Bangladesh side. And that


A strong West Wind!

Posted by: Bittu Sahgal on

Today was a very special day for me. I met with 80 pre-primary children from West Wind School, Mumbai. My message to them? Nature is your best friend and will look after you forever, but you must also look after Mother Nature and not hurt her in any way.  We spoke about the tiger, about whale sharks, the oceans, the high


ELEPHANT TRAUMA

Posted by: Bittu Sahgal on

Mysore put elephants on the front pages of newspaper and in the headlines of television news yesterday. Check this out to understand the trauma to both humans and the elephants.

http://www.ndtv.com/article/cities/wild-elephants-on-rampage-in-mysore-city-one-killed-110859

But its like this. Elephants need space to survive. If we


The Sanctuary Cover Story June 2011 explores whether and how we can negotiate a path by availing of the immense potential of tourism to educate, conserve and offer employment, YET avoid the minefield of misuse and abuse that afflicts many of our finest wildernesses. And in the process can we ensure that wild species and the people who live next to them become primary beneficiaries of tourism? Can wildlife tourism physically enhance the quality and quantum of habitat available to wild species? People have grappled with this issue for over a century, but few people put the issue in better perspective than Aldo Leopold, the famous American naturalist, who opined that, "The problem with wildlife management is not how we handle the deer - the real problem is one of human management."


The Fate of the Tiger

Posted by: Bittu Sahgal on

As my friend Ian McCullum, author of Ecological Intelligence once opined, nature is not slipping through our fingers, we are slipping through nature's fingers!

Despite all the bad news around us and despite Jairam Ramesh's quixotic U-turn on environmental issues, I think we might just about manage to keep the tiger's head above


Bandhavgarh - RED FLAG.

Posted by: Shivir chordia on

 

A new season in a Tiger reserve  is always something one looks forward to, there is always news ....news about young cubs, news about the old tigers - how and what they are doing...news about tiger counts - who is showing off ? who is not ?.., news about birds - new winter migrants, etc.. etc ...then there is always news


Hi Folks!
I was travelling on work to inspect one of my Battalions located in Jungalberri some 12 km from Sujanpur in Hamirpur district in Himachal Pradesh.

This short journey was most rewarding in the last few days as we saw a dozen Ruddy Shelducks in the Beas river at Sujanpur. Their sighting has never been reported from


Man as Brute

Posted by: Bittu Sahgal on


http://www.orissatv.com/NewsDetail.asp?newsId=NS35497

We cannot look upon this as "yet another leopard incident."

We need to make an example of a few of these people because such incidents are fast becoming the norm. Brij, Valmik, Divya and Ranjitsinh and I have been around long enough to remember how hard we have fought to