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Tourism: wildlife boon or bane

Posted by: Bittu Sahgal on

Its a tough one to answer, but yes, there is an an answer. Not an easy one, but it can be done.

 In Rwanda (and several other countries that have learned to turn their wildlife tourism into a sustainable income source for the nation and for the communities living next to wild places), a central, online booking facility offers


Mumbai's Miracle Forest

Posted by: Bittu Sahgal on

On Sunday, September 2, 2013, a GreenKarbon team from Deutsche Bank and Sanctuary Asia, undertook a study trek in the Sanjay Gandhi National Park where the Director of the Park, Mr. Limaye, began  by explaining that along with the scores of other problems, this city forest was being choked by plastic being thrown by careless

So, after giving the Supreme Court faulty advice, the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) realises that it acted in haste, but it will nevertheless be forced to repent at leisure... at the expense of a nation riven with quixotic planning, short-term goals and insensitivity to the environment that support us all.


The news came in three days ago about the Supreme Court of India banning tourism in the core areas of national parks and sanctuaries in response to a Public Interest Litigation filed. While everyone waits for the text of the final ruling, clearly this is a case where the law has confused the current impact of tourism (negative)


Unknown Karnataka 2 -- Melukote WLS

Posted by: Suresh K L on

About Melukote: It's a small temple town located in Mandya district of southern Karnataka on top a hill with series of rocky outcrop hills surrounding it. Entering Melukote is like entering into bygone era. Here is a place, where you enter lost world of south Indian temples with priests of Vedic charm. Melukote is the favourite

Monsoon at Kabini

Posted by: Sukanta Das on

 

As the Climate suggests, it is raining at regular intervals in Kabini which has had a direct impact on occupancy at our resort. Yet there is a set of clienteles who visit our resort every three months to experience the Forest in all its colours. We are four Naturalists here at Kabini and are having the much awaited free time


The Sanctuary Cover Story June 2011 explores whether and how we can negotiate a path by availing of the immense potential of tourism to educate, conserve and offer employment, YET avoid the minefield of misuse and abuse that afflicts many of our finest wildernesses. And in the process can we ensure that wild species and the people who live next to them become primary beneficiaries of tourism? Can wildlife tourism physically enhance the quality and quantum of habitat available to wild species? People have grappled with this issue for over a century, but few people put the issue in better perspective than Aldo Leopold, the famous American naturalist, who opined that, "The problem with wildlife management is not how we handle the deer - the real problem is one of human management."


Bandhavgarh - RED FLAG.

Posted by: Shivir chordia on

 

A new season in a Tiger reserve  is always something one looks forward to, there is always news ....news about young cubs, news about the old tigers - how and what they are doing...news about tiger counts - who is showing off ? who is not ?.., news about birds - new winter migrants, etc.. etc ...then there is always news


The Satpura Experience...

Posted by: Raza Kazmi on

 

 THE SATPURA EXPERIENCE

 

 

 The Journey Begins….. 

  

As soon as the Indore-Bilaspur Express pulled away from the Bhopal Railway station on the chilly night of 13th Feb 2010 at 11:10 pm, I could feel the Butterflies in my stomach. Our destination—Sohagpur, an obscure station in the Hoshangabad District of Madhya Pradesh. I was


We must all be players

Posted by: Bittu Sahgal on

It was dry and very hot. At around 3.30 p.m. on a May day, temperatures hovered around 45 degrees C in the shade and the perspiration evaporated almost as fast as it appeared. But this did not bother me. From the bamboo thicket to our left we had heard the bell-like alarms of a sambar deer. A tiger was about. Ten, fifteen,