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Valmiki Tiger Reserve

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Shades of green under the eves of Bihar’s second Tiger Reserve, Valmiki, promise to bring as much mirth to a traveller as birdsong that hangs in the air. Valmiki, the 18th and younger of the 27 Tiger Reserves is situated in the northernmost part of the West Champaran district the State. This 464 sq. km. reserve is embedded in a land almost locked in ancient days, where mighty warriors brandished swords and kings respected the natural wonderland.

  • Plan your trip
  • Wild life
  • Habitat
  • Places to see
  • Useful Tips
  • History

Best Season

An ideal time to visit the Park would be anytime between October and June.

Accommodation

A number of rest houses with basic facilities are available for stay.

Transport 

Bettiah (80 km.) is the nearest town.

By Air: Patna (295 km.) is the nearest airport.

By Rail: Valmiki Nagar (5 km.) is the closest accessible railhead.

By Road: Buses ply from Valmiki Nagar to Bettiah.

Useful Contacts

Deputy Conservator of Forests, Champaran Forest Division, P.O. Betia, Dist. Champaran, Bihar.

The Valmiki Tiger reserve is bastion of the tiger, the flagship species of the Indian subcontinent. The lesser-known but one whose beauty can be described as par excellence, is the fishing cat, and the leopard and jungle cat often seen in this part of tiger land. Trees stripped of bark and claw marks upto great heights reveal the presence of the sloth bear. Wolves, hyenas, dhole and the one-horned rhinoceros and Indian bison occasionally migrate here from Chitwan. The Rhesus macaque and the langur, which form the dominant primate species in the region are often seen swooping across trees, under the shade of which agile and wary sambar, chital, hog deer and blackbuck are seen grazing.

Unfortunately, its very richness of the jungles and its strategic location (contiguous with both the international boundary and inter-state boundary) makes it ideal for poachers and timber fellers, constantly plundering its wealth.

Steep ravines, sharp-edged ridges with sudden and steep walls, and a continuation of the Siwalik Range hill system, formed by erosion characterise much of the terrain. The Reserve is an undulating land of broken tracts with extremely fragile geological formations, comprising ill-formed sandstone. The perennial waters of the Gandak and the Masan and those of seasonal rivers such as the Panchanad, Manor, Bhapsa and Kapan water the Reserve, constantly ‘excavating’ soil from one site, while depositing it at another. The majestic Himalaya forms a picturesque backdrop, which is bounded by the Royal Chitwan National Park of Nepal on the north and the Gandak which flows in the west. 

The vegetation, can be described as mix of bhabar dun sal forests, dry siwalik sal forest, West Gangetic moist mixed-deciduous forest, khair or sisoo forest, and is dominated by trees such as Sal Shorea robusta, asan, karama, semal, cane Calamus tenuis, jamun, siccharrum, mahulan, piper, and lagun (peepar). The Eastern wet alluvial grasslands and Barringtonia swamp forests are prominent in the jungles of Valmiki.

No information available. 

No information available. 

Asoka the Great, as the mighty warrior was referred to, fought the mighty battle of Kalinga during his reign and killed ruthlessly in order to expand his kingdom before he surrendered all and took on the path of Buddhism and ahimsa or non-violence. The Asoka Stupa, the Bawan Garhi and the fort of Someshwar Fort are replete with tales of the past. Triveni where the three rivers Gandak, Sonha and Pachanad merge, not long after they emerge from the hills, is said to be the site where the fight between the lords of forest and water – the elephant and crocodile commenced.

The Government of Bihar, in 1978 declared an area of 464.60 sq. km., which now forms the reserve as Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in 1989. Later on, in 1990, about 419.18 sq. km. was added to the sanctuary, totaling to 880.78 sq. km.

 
 
 

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